Posts Tagged ‘plotting’

Subplots

Monday, April 12th, 2010
The following short essay is taken from Chapter Six in Build a Better Story.
Unless a story is very short, a single plot will have difficulty holding a reader’s attention.  If the story drives from the beginning to the end in a straight line, it lacks complexity.  If the story line zigs and dips and otherwise detours from its goal as secondary issues are explored, it increases the reader’s interest.  That is the purpose of subplots: to defer the ending of the story and increase the reader’s interest. BABS CoverSubplots do this by providing a break from the main plot and allow added complications, diversions and trickery to further entertain the reader.
There is a preferred arrangement for organizing the subplots; they should be nested within the main plot.  Thus, the story always starts with the main plot.  After the main plot gets established, subplot A is introduced.  Back to the main plot for a while followed by the introduction to subplot B.  The same technique is used for subplot C and subplot D, if necessary.  In this structure, subplot A is not as important as the main plot but is more important than subplot B.  Subplot C is of less importance than subplot B, but is more important than subplot D.  In fact, it is possible with a minor subplot such as D, not to show it at all, but to merely have the characters discuss its progress from time to time.
When approaching the end of the story, subplot D is closed first, followed by subplot C, then B, then A and finally the main plot is concluded.
Have a story that needs to be told?  Build a Better Story will help you get it done.  The trailer will explain more about the book.


Build a Better Story

Saturday, April 3rd, 2010

Build a Better Story is now available at Smashwords for download in EPUB, MOBI, LRF, PDB, and TXT formats.  It is available on my website in .PDF format.BABS cover

Have a story that needs to be told?  Here’s the best way to go about doing it.The book describes a process that eases the work involved in developing a story.  This reduces the time spent in reworking flawed and imperfect drafts. Following the process allows more time to be spent on the creative activities and shortens the time spent on less creative work.

Besides the process, this book takes a unique approach to character building and plotting.  It identifies problem areas that inexperienced writers struggle with and explains how to address those problems including character motivation and scene design.


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Fiction Writing Discussion

Wednesday, January 6th, 2010

Starting today, (1/6/10) I’ll be a guest on the Writebuzz website to discuss various aspects of fiction writing.  This week’s topic is Story Construction. The remaining schedule is as follows:

1/13: Motivation

1/20: Characterization

1/27: Plotting.

Stop by and check out the discussion.  You may like the site and elect to join it.